The Fisherfield Deargs

The Fisherfield Deargs

Hillwalking route to Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag in Fisherfield

A cycle on a fine estate track leads into the heart of Fisherfield Forest in which sits the rugged Corbett pair of Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag, the 'Fisherfield Deargs'.



Route outline


Corbetts

Beinn Dearg Mor, 

Beinn Dearg Bheag

Walk ascent 1200m (3930ft)
         distance 22km (14m)
         time 7:30hr
Bike ascent 700m (2290ft)
         distance 19km (12m)
         time 2:00hr
Start/finish Corrie Hallie
Grid Ref : NH114851
Terrain
easy hard
Nav
easy hard
Effort
easy hard
Scenery
ok fab


Standing in the remote wilderness of Fisherfield Forest, Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag offer a smaller yet equally captivating counterpart to An Teallach across Loch na Sealga.

These two Corbetts feature fascinating rock formations, with several spurs and shoulders leading up to rugged spires. Apart from the distance involved, reaching the summits of Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag poses no significant challenges for the seasoned hillwalker, though their airy summits provide an exhilarating experience. There are some fine rock-scrambling routes on Beinn Dearg Mor's eastern and southern shoulders.

To get into the heart of Fisherfield, most people will walk from Corrie Hallie to Shenavall, however biking to nearby Achnegie instead will save time and effort, and there is a well defined set of ATV tracks to follow thereafter on the southern side of Strath na Sealga.



Route map

×
Show map


Route description


1. Getting to Corrie Hallie

Destitution Road to Dundonnell

Destitution Road to Dundonnell

Around 12km south of Ullapool, the A832 branches off the main A835 at Braemore junction by the Corrieshalloch gorge and visitor centre. This road climbs over moorland and drops to Dundonnell at the southern tip of Little Loch Broom. Corrie Hallie is situated around 3km south of Dundonnell.

By Corrie Hallie, close to a bright orange (now more rust coloured than orange) snow-barrier, there is a long layby where there is room for around 10 vehicles. There is more parking in a few spots just to the south of the layby.


2. Achnegie

On the track into Fisherfield

On the track into Fisherfield

Compared to walking, biking in will cut down the journey time considerably, allowing. The alternative on foot takes a slightly different route, following a rough footpath to Shenevall Bothy, 2km north-west of Achnegie.

From the layby at Corrie Hallie, cross the road and start uphill on a decent track by an orange snow-gate. The track turns and meets a gate, beyond which is a field, most likely containing livestock (probably sheep, but I've also seen cows here).

Into the field, follow the track for 2km uphill and through woodland. The track comes to watercrossing , which should be easy to cross, but if in spate, there a wooden bridge slightly upstream. The track thereafter turns and climbs steeply for 1km to reach its highest point, marked by a cairn .

Beyond the cairn, the track comes to a junction - the right hand fork is the footpath heading to Shenevall Bothy, which unfortunately isn't really cycleable. So if on bike, stay on main track which crosses undulating ground for around 2km, with good views of An Teallach ridge on the right and views ahead to Fisherfield with Beinn Dearg Mor gradually revealing itself.

The track drops in a series of turns to the Abhainn Loch an Nid in the Strath na Sealga below, with a final turn northwards as it reaches the glen floor. Nearby is a lovely birch woodland which is a beautiful place to camp.

Strath na Sealga and Beinn Dearg Mor

Strath na Sealga and Beinn Dearg Mor

Achnegie is around 1km further on and where I've tended to I drop off my bike.

Strath na Sealga and Beinn Dearg Mor

Strath na Sealga and Beinn Dearg Mor


3. Gleann na Muice Beag

ATV tracks in Strath na Sealga

ATV tracks in Strath na Sealga

The track ends by the rather dilapidated building at Achnegie and a path takes over. Follow this path north-west for a short distance to where a bend in the Abhainn Strath na Sealga comes close. Leave the path and cross the river (difficult and dangerous in spate).

Around 500m ahead, signs of ATV tracks on a slight rise can be seen - aim for this . Once on the tracks (not marked on maps), follow for around 2km around the foot of Beinn a' Chlaidheimh towards the buildings of Larachantivore. Before reaching Larachantivore, the tracks turn southwards and reach the eastern bank of the Allt Gleann na Muice.

Cross the Allt Gleann na Muice at a suitable point (difficult in spate, there used to be a wire across the river by Larachantivore, but is no longer there).

Once onto the river's western bank, a well-worn path is met travelling below the eastern and southern faces of Beinn Dearg Mor - there are some summer rock-scrambling routes from this direction - see 'Highland Scrambles North' published by the Scottish Mountaineering Club.

Path aside the Abhainn Gleann na Muice

Path aside the Abhainn Gleann na Muice

The path is followed southwards for 1.5km south down Gleann na Muice to an obvious junction where close by, there is a lovely grass-covered flat area which is ideal for camping.

Path aside the Abhainn Gleann na Muice

Path aside the Abhainn Gleann na Muice


4. Beinn Dearg Bheag

Beinn Dearg Bheag from the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

Beinn Dearg Bheag from the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

From the junction , take the right fork and follow a rough path as it begins to climb gently through Gleann na Muice Beag. After climbing around 150 metres, the path swings southwards - leave it here, aiming northwards and climbing through deep grass and over occasional boulders. The ground levels out with Loch Beinn Dearg below and to the left. Ahead, the cone of Beinn Dearg Bheag can be seen peeking above the hillsides.

Traverse a grassy hillside, initially aiming below some crags, then above some crags, and then over gently rising ground to aim for the bealach between Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag. There are several erratic boulders at the bealach, including a quite astounding naturally formed rock structure.

From the bealach, follow a crest northwards. A faint path begins to form - trace this up Beinn Dearg Bheag's southern shoulder. Higher up, the ground becomes quite loose as the crest narrows and turns north-eastwards.

On the summit of Beinn Dearg Bheag, looking to Sail Mhor

On the summit of Beinn Dearg Bheag, looking to Sail Mhor

A tiny cairn formed from a few boulders stands on the narrow grassy ledge of Beinn Dearg Bheag's summit , overlooking some dramatic drops to the north-west, and from where the views are quite vast.

On the summit of Beinn Dearg Bheag, looking to Sail Mhor

On the summit of Beinn Dearg Bheag, looking to Sail Mhor


5. Beinn Dearg Mor

Beinn Dearg Mor from the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

Beinn Dearg Mor from the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

From the summit of Beinn Dearg Bheag, turn around and retrace your steps back to the bealach below .

Follow the crest south-eastwards above Coire Toll an Lochain as it gently climbs over grass-covered terrain. You'll reach the base of Beinn Dearg Mor's imposing screes , where a path can be seen zigzagging uphill (reminiscent of Sgurr Eilde Mor in the Mamores!). Follow this path as it ascends approximately 150 metres to a small marker cairn at the western end of Beinn Dearg Mor's summit crest.

Beinn Dearg Mor's main summit and eastern top with An Teallach between

Beinn Dearg Mor's main summit and eastern top with An Teallach between

Turning northwest, you'll find a large cairn on Beinn Dearg Mor's summit just 200 metres away. Beware the crest narrows significantly near the cairn, with dramatic drops developing to the north and north-east.

Beinn Dearg Mor's main summit and eastern top with An Teallach between

Beinn Dearg Mor's main summit and eastern top with An Teallach between


6. Return via Coire Toll an Lochain

Beinn Dearg Bheag above Coire Toll an Lochain

Beinn Dearg Bheag above Coire Toll an Lochain

From Beinn Dearg Mor's summit, turn around and return to the small cairn at the south-western end of the summit. Descend the path through the screes back to the bealach between Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag.

From the col, you could simply retrace your route back to Achnegie.

Alternatively, from the bealach and near the unusual rock structure, head north-east down into Coire Toll an Lochain. The descent is fairly steep, grass-covered and secure underfoot. Around the lochan in the coire, cross its outflow and hike down grassy terrain with hidden divots towards Loch na Sealga.

By the loch's shoreline, you'll find a well-defined, though rough, path . Follow this path east-wards. The path turns away from the loch and at the end of a long straight heading south-east , leave it crossing pathless grass-covered ground toward where the Abhainn Srath na Sealga and Abhainn na Muice meet. Unless in spate, crossing the two rivers shouldn't be too troublesome, unlike the surrounding ground on the northern bank, which is boggy with deep grass hiding wet holes.

Weird rocks on the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

Weird rocks on the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

Eventually, the ground becomes more manageable as Shenavall bothy is neared. A path is picked up below the bothy and this is followed for just over 2 km back to Achnegie .

Weird rocks on the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain

Weird rocks on the bealach above Coire Toll an Lochain





Route profile »




Maps and GPX downloads »


Information on maps and GPX files is on this page.

The map images above link to items on Amazon. A small commission is earned on any map purchased which helps fund the operating costs of this website.





Weather forecasts »




Alternative and nearby routes »


Fisherfield Big 6

The 5 Munros in Fisherfield, along with the Corbett Beinn a'Chlaidheimh (which used to be a Munro), are affectionately known as the 'Fisherfield Big 6'. Although most hikers backpack in and bag the peaks over two or three days, it is quite feasable to bag them in a day, particularly with the help of a bike on the track in.

Peaks : 5 Munros, 1 Corbett, plus option of more !

Ascent : 2905m (9530ft)
Distance : 44km (27m)
Time : 12:15hr

Sail Mhor from Ardessie

This fairly direct approach up Sail Mhor from above Little Loch Broom, takes a bit of a detour to avoid craggy northern faces and makes for a delightful afternoon's hillwalk.

Peaks : 1 Corbett

Ascent : 850m (2790ft)
Distance : 9km (6m)
Time : 3:40hr

Letterewe Corbetts from Poolewe

A bike-and-hike route leads into the rugged wilderness of Letterewe and Fisherfield forests, where the magnificent Corbetts of Beinn Lair, Beinn Airigh Charr, and Beinn a' Chaisgein Mor stand isolated and remote.

Peaks : 3 Corbetts, 1 Graham

Ascent : 2775m (9100ft)
Distance : 46km (29m)
Time : 16:10hr

Creag Rainich from Loch a' Bhraoin

Bagging the grass-covered Corbett hill of Creag Rainich is fairly straightforward if taking a hillwalking route from Loch a' Bhraoin.

Peaks : 1 Corbett

Ascent : 840m (2760ft)
Distance : 17km (11m)
Time : 5:40hr









Contact

Contact me

Follow